Freediving Sites

The Leap, Sydney’s Premier Shore Freediving Site

Depth: down to 21m

Best Time to Dive: Incoming tide approaching high tide, seas must be flat.

The Leap is a site well known to SCUBA divers but often neglected by the keen Freediver. Nestled in the beautiful Kamay National Park between Cape Solander and Sutherland Point is the dive site called “The Leap”.

The Leap gets its name from the stunning 2m drop into the water; often daunting with heavy SCUBA equipment but made simple and exciting with just a set of bi-fins, mask, and weights.

Many a SCUBA knows that the entry at the Leap is a one-way trip; once you’ve jumped, you’re hard-pressed to exit safely again. It’s always treated as drift dive on the incoming tide with the finish point at The Steps. For Freedivers; the entire site is accessible from shore, with a gentle exit available no more than 50m from the entry point. This is due to our lack of all that heavy SCUBA equipment, getting in and out at “The Leap” has never been easier!

As soon as you enter the water; there are shallow walls, swimthroughs, and gullies easily accessible to even the most novice of Freedivers. The site is best accessed during the slack high tide; the upwelling of fresh, clear ocean water filling Botany Bay allows for the greatest exploration of the site.

The Freediving Team at Abyss has also installed a fixed freediving block and float sitting in 21m of water. The float itself is not accessible from the surface; to prevent any issues with boat traffic, however, can be easily clipped off too with a float line as it sits approx 5m under the surface. This makes the Leap an ideal location for freediving; it is now set up for both recreational freediving and freediver training. The block and line can be located with the following marks:

 

N.West 310 degrees (Captain Cook Red Landing Buoy)

N.East 30 degrees (White Lighthouse on opposite headland)

S.East 160 degrees (Kurnell headland)

West 270 degrees (The Leap steps/ladder)

Markings for Freediver Block at the Leap

Apart from common sea dragons, other fish to be seen here are common stingrays, flatheads, leatherjackets of all sorts, bream, moray eels, small cuttlefish, old wife, bream, luderick, sergeant baker, blue groper and different types of wrasse and sometimes if you are lucky, a seahorse.

Freediving in Sydney is adventurous, exciting and easily accessible from many points around the shoreline. Make sure you keep an eye on our calendar for our upcoming events and if you haven’t already; join the Abyss Freediving Club for access discounts on upcoming freediving events, trips, and overseas travel.

The Leap 

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